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Hinduja, S., & Patchin, J.W. (2010). Bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide. Archives of Suicide Research, 14, 206-221.

Approximately 2,000 students from 30 middle schools in the United States participated in this study. Suicidal ideation was measured by four yes/no questions; they included have you ever felt so sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more in a row that you stopped doing some usual activities, have you ever seriously thought about attempting suicide, have you ever made a specific plan about how you would attempt suicide, and have you ever attempted suicide. Traditional bullying victimization represented the respondent’s experience in the previous 30 days as a victim of 10 different forms of bullying. Traditional bullying offending represented the respondent’s experience in the previous 30 days as an offender of 10 different forms of bullying. Cyberbullying victimization represented the respondent’s experience in the previous 30 days as a victim of nine different forms of online aggression. Lastly, cyberbullying offending represented the respondent’s participation in the previous 30 days with five different forms of online aggression.

Results: With regard to traditional bullying, prevalence rates ranged from 6.5% to 27.7% for offending and from 10.9% to 29.3% for victimization. With regard to cyberbullying, prevalence rates ranged from 9.1% to 23.1% for offending and from 5.7% to 18.3% for victimization. With respect to bullying, all forms were significantly associated with increases in suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts among respondents.

Discussion: The findings suggest that a suicide prevention and intervention component is essential within comprehensive bullying response programs implemented in schools.